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Notes From A Hockey Mom: Glory Days Junior Hockey News

Published: Friday, 13 Nov 2020  
By: Michelle Anderson, Behind the Champ


I was a reluctant hockey parent.  When my son became obsessed, I thought his obsession would pass.  When it didn’t, I tried bribery.  When that didn’t work, I played the daddy’s little girl card and got my dad to pay for his first set of equipment.  We all want what’s best for our kids, and we will go to the ends of the earth to give that to them, so since he wanted to play, I gave it my all, too.  Got my level 1 coaching card to keep mites in line and chase pucks as an assistant coach, and when the kids’ skills got close to surpassing mine, I let the card lapse and switched to team manager, running the clock, keeping score, and running doors or the box.  

I got caught up in as much of the craziness as I could afford and then some.  Set the summer camp budget and usually blew it.  Kiddo wanted the most expensive gloves in the store?  I justified that.  Three hundred dollar composite stick for a PeeWee?  Did that, too. Even fellow hockey parents told me I was crazy, but I justified that because I only had one child, and they had multiple children, so I told myself we were spending the same amount of money.  I was just spending it on one kid instead of three.  I spend most of my waking hours working to pay for it to this day, and there have been times I have cut down to two meals a day for myself so I could afford it.

Since I’m not a dad whose hockey career ended in junior B, no one thinks I’m living vicariously through my kid, but I am.  It’s just not in the way that you might think.  I’ve got a couple of missed opportunities from my younger days, and I know now I didn’t take those opportunities out of fear.  I gave up before I gave myself a chance, and I don’t want that for my son.  I want him to face those fears head on, and keep going until it is literally impossible to go anymore.  I don’t want him to be 30 or 40 or 50 and wonder what might have been.  I want him to have tried every possible way to get there. 

I want it to become a habit not to give up on his goals or himself.  I don’t want setbacks to completely derail him, and I want him to realize that when other people are telling him he can’t do it, that is simply them projecting their own fears and insecurities onto him. I want him to know he is the one in complete charge of his life,and he doesn’t have to sit back and wait for things to just happen.  He can make them happen.  

I can’t get my missed opportunities back, but I can try my best to make sure my son misses as few as possible of his.  If I’m being completely honest, besides pushing him because I believe in him, there’s also a part of me that wants him to succeed just because so many have told him he can’t.  I do believe in him or I wouldn’t make the sacrifices I have made, but there is most definitely a part of me that would relish being able to shove that success in the faces of those who doubted him. 


Author: Michelle Anderson from Behind the Champ
Hello! I am a Minnesota hockey mom of 15 years with a son currently playing junior hockey. My son was 2 ½ when he saw his first hockey game, and he became obsessed with playing hockey himself. I thought, “He’s 2. It will pass.” It didn’t. I have to admit that I knew absolutely nothing about hockey when we first started this journey, but I learned quickly along the way thanks to all the other hockey parents out there. I also saw how much fun he was having so I joined a women’s league and learned how to play myself. The kids make it look a lot easier than it is, but it’s a beautiful game and tons of fun both to watch and to play, even badly in my case. I look forward to bringing you a hockey mom’s point of view to these shenanigans in the world of junior hockey.


* Disclaimer: This site may contain advice, opinions and statements from various authors and information providers. Views expressed in this article reflect the personal opinion of the author, Michelle Anderson, and not necessarily the views of JuniorHockey.com. JuniorHockey.com does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other info provided in the article, or from any other member of this site.
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