Close
 
JuniorHockey.com
News DailyDish Players
Radio Discuss

Daily Dish: Social (Media) Injustice or Stupidity? Junior Hockey News

Published: Thursday, 3 Oct 2019  
By: Stephen Heisler, JuniorHockey.com


Players hear about it all the time but for some reason the message misses the mark for some players. Don't say something on any social media platform that would upset your grandparents, parents, or future in-laws.

When are people going to realize that the internet is all about information? Social media platforms collect all types of personal information that they retain and sell to the highest bidder. Why are they free? No, they are not free. They are bought and paid for with your interests, likes, dislikes, imagery, and content. There's that word...content. We'll get back to that in a minute.

Who buys this information and why? Advertisers for one, but that's just the easy buyer. The most important buyer is more inquisitive, they want to know what kind of person you are. That could be a future college coach, employer, or even the in-laws. Getting access to this type of info is easy and all it requires is a valid credit card with a decent limit.

So what are they going to find? This answer is the easiest. EVERYTHING. The word "delete" is a myth when it comes to the internet and social media platforms. They keep all your content. 

We all know the story of what happened last week in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League where Yorkton Terriers forward Greg Mulhall plowed Melville Millionaires goalie Berk Berkeliev during a game on September 25. The video is absolutely brutal. The poor goalie spent the night in the hospital after suffering a concussion and several lost teeth from the cheap shot.

The hit was not the dumbest move of Mulhall's career. That came Sunday when the future rocket scientist decided to post a video regarding his antics.

You see, it is possible to drop a virtual atomic bomb on your own reputation. 

In the video the Fort Saskatchewan native is seen using profanity and bragging about the hit, he's appears proud that he hurt another player.

I could just imagine the video sent league commissioner Bill Chow into orbit. Rocket scientist are good at that sort of thing.

The league announced shortly after the video surfaced that it was “severing ties with Mulhall for the remainder of the 2019-20 hockey season.”

Just minutes later, the Terriers confirmed on Twitter that Mulhall had been released.

To his credit, Mulhall did take to Twitter himself and apologized for the comments. 

That's the thing right? Who is going to remember the apology? Maybe the goalie, and that's nice. Forgiveness is much easier than forgetting. We all know this kid's name now.

So, what can he do to resurrect his otherwise dead-end hockey career? If he were one of our players, I think my partners would have all but hired a hit squad. No seriously, he needs to take a few weeks off before packing his bags and heading north to the Western States Hockey League. I'm not talking about the division in Canada either.

He needs to go somewhere like Steamboat Springs where nobody really follows hockey that closely anyway. He needs a fresh start and that also means he has to stay on a short leash. Kids make stupid mistakes, heck, I made well over a thousand of them. Sometimes it takes a bolt of reality to change one's perspective.

Mulhall's career does not have to be over. But he does need to leave this business behind him or face the even more certain possibility of never being able to play the game again. Personally, I think this story could have a positive ending and am looking forward to the kid's next move. Let's hope it also turns the boy into a man.

Author: Stephen Heisler from JuniorHockey.com
Stephen Heisler has spent a lifetime in the game of hockey. Stephen is also working with individual teams, coaches, and players as a director with Victorious Hockey Company. Stephen, his wife Deysi, and four children reside in Orlando, Florida.


* Disclaimer: This site may contain advice, opinions and statements from various authors and information providers. Views expressed in this article reflect the personal opinion of the author, Stephen Heisler, and not necessarily the views of JuniorHockey.com. JuniorHockey.com does not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other info provided in the article, or from any other member of this site.
See more of JuniorHockey.com by logging in
Your online community for Junior Hockey!
AboutAdvertiseContact